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Stramash

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Stramash last won the day on August 2 2013

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About Stramash

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    Original TF'er
  • Birthday 06/06/1966

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  1. Me too. But some of the expats are right arseholes (not ones called Rob)
  2. And that attitude is why 90% of the world think you are wankers and why we are laughing as your country slowly imploded. First secession in USA by 2040 max
  3. Stramash

    Incident Report

    Rob has a very shiny helmet
  4. There are plans for a new culinary venture in Bangkok that may have netizens and animal lovers alike reaching for their keyboards in indignation. Controversial South African chef Pieter Van Grap plans on opening his new high end venue ‘Rariteit’ (‘Rarity’ In Afrikaans) sometime in September 2013 with negotiations at an advanced stage for a central location Van Grap himself describes as ‘simply stunning with unrivalled cityscape views’. So what exactly is the controversy surrounding a new eatery in a city renowned for fusion and experimentation existing alongside traditional menus? Quite simply, nearly every meat dish appearing on Van Grap’s menu is an animal that appears somewhere on the endangered species list. Yet every piece of meat is legally obtained, has impeccable provenance and, Van Grap states, ‘…is supporting conservation of each of these species.’ Coming so soon after the Bangkok held CITES conference, could this be a step too far restaurant wise? Coconuts asked Van Grap to explain further. ‘Quite often, even when an animal appears on the endangered species list, hunting can be a vital part of any conservation effort. I got the idea on a visit to Texas last year where I met Charley Seale, executive director of The Exotic Wildlife Association, which represents around 5,000 ranchers in Texas, all of whom raise exotic animals, and some of those animals are still on the endangered species list. We flew over the area in a helicopter and it was like being at home in Africa; herds of zebras, antelopes and gazelles running across this landscape. They have had particular success with the scimitar horned oryx, the addax and the dama gazelle, 3 species whose numbers were dangerously dwindling in Africa but which now thrive in Texas. I ate all 3 of these animals at the ranch barbecue that night, and in that moment Rariteit was born. Same with elephant; there are areas and reserves where numbers need to be controlled. Allowing hunting permits helps fund conservation efforts there and by creating a limited market for that meat, I am helping those efforts further.’ So that’s the background, but what can we expect food wise? ‘I have a great team of myself, 2 highly talented young Thais and my Zambian second chef. We’re looking at taking traditional African recipes and bringing them into the 21st Century with an Asian twist for the African originating animals, and doing twists on traditional Asian and Thai dishes with those animals from this area such as the Siamese Crocodile and the Gaur (a type of wild Asian cow). Seafood wise we are lucky enough to have sourced some Chinook Salmon and some top quality Bluefin Tuna. And everything has a 100% ethical provenance. So, for example, I found this fantastic recipe for Elephant Soup in Tanzania and we’ve added chilli and coconut milk and some secret ingredients to give it a very Asian flavour. We have also adapted a traditional South African potjiekos (stew) for the Dama Gazelle meat and this is one dish I am particularly proud of.’ So, is Bangkok ready for such rare delights? Will people accept that this is now a necessary part of the overall conservation effort? Or will Van Grap’s new venture be endangered from the start. Rariteit opens September 2013 in an as yet undisclosed Bangkok location
  5. [h=1]Fukushima town revealed in Google Street View two years after tsunami[/h]Mayor of Namie invites Google's cameras in to stop world forgetting twin disasters of tsunami then nuclear meltdown The Fukushima town of Namie, captured by Google Street View. Photograph: Google Two years after Fukushima's triple nuclear meltdown forced tens of thousands of residents to flee, it is possible to take a virtual journey deep into the exclusion zone to one of the towns they left behind. Google Street View has published striking images of the devastation visited on Namie by the March 2011 tsunami and nuclear meltdown: abandoned homes, shops and restaurants, fields blanketed in grass and weeds. Google's camera-equipped vehicles began filming in Namie this month at the invitation of its mayor, Tamotsu Baba, whose sadness at his town's fate is matched by fears that the rest of the world is forgetting about Fukushima. For residents from towns and villages near the crippled power plant, the crisis is far from over. About 160,000 who fled the 12-mile evacuation zone, including 21,000 from Namie, are still living in temporary housing. Those from areas closest to the site may have to wait decades before their irradiated communities are safe to live in again. Many older residents accept they will die before their homes are inhabitable; their younger relatives are trying to build new lives elsewhere. Google's Street View imagery takes users on a 360-degree virtual tour of Namie's eerily quiet streets, its earthquake-damaged buildings and the overturned cars and fishing boats resting where they were deposited by the tsunami. Koto Naganuma, 32, whose home was destroyed by the waves, believes some Namie residents will be upset by images of familiar places that have been out of bounds for two years, but he is excited about plans to open up parts of the town for temporary visits from next month. "I'm looking forward to it," said Naganuma, who has visited Namie just once – and only for a few minutes – since the disaster. "I'm excited about being able to take a look at those places that are so dear to me. It will be hard, too. No one is going to be there." Baba said viewing Google's images brought back fond memories of festivals and other communal events in a tightly knit town, whose residents are scattered across Fukushima prefecture and other parts of Japan. "Those of us who belong to the older generation feel that we received this town from our ancestors, and we feel great pain that we cannot pass it down to our children," he said in a blogpost. "Ever since the disaster, the rest of the world has been moving forward and many places in Japan have started recovering. But, in Namie, time stands still. "We want this Street View imagery to become a permanent record of what happened to Namie in the earthquake, tsunami and nuclear disaster." Panoramic imagery of the town will be available on Google Maps, Google Earth and the Memories for the Future site, which has already carried before-and-after images of coastal communities swept away by the tsunami. "By capturing and publishing this imagery, we hope to allow people in Namie, in Japan and all around the world to see what the town currently looks like," the company said. "We also hope that this will keep alive memories of the disaster for future generations." The second anniversary of the disaster this month highlighted the plight of more than 300,000 people in north-east Japan who have yet to be permanently rehoused. The prime minister, Shinzo Abe, has promised to speed up the construction of homes for displaced tsunami survivors and nuclear evacuees. Abe, who visited Namie last weekend, is to announce plans this summer for the return of residents to some areas of the evacuation zone. Abe is expected to offer a timeframe for the completion of infrastructure repairs and the resumption of health and other services in selected neighbourhoods. But the operation to decontaminate residential areas is well behind schedule and the government has not found a storage site for huge quantities of irradiated soil and rubble. http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2013/mar/27/fukushima-google-street-view-meltdown-tsunami
  6. [h=1]Fukushima town revealed in Google Street View two years after tsunami[/h]Mayor of Namie invites Google's cameras in to stop world forgetting twin disasters of tsunami then nuclear meltdown The Fukushima town of Namie, captured by Google Street View. Photograph: Google Two years after Fukushima's triple nuclear meltdown forced tens of thousands of residents to flee, it is possible to take a virtual journey deep into the exclusion zone to one of the towns they left behind. Google Street View has published striking images of the devastation visited on Namie by the March 2011 tsunami and nuclear meltdown: abandoned homes, shops and restaurants, fields blanketed in grass and weeds. Google's camera-equipped vehicles began filming in Namie this month at the invitation of its mayor, Tamotsu Baba, whose sadness at his town's fate is matched by fears that the rest of the world is forgetting about Fukushima. For residents from towns and villages near the crippled power plant, the crisis is far from over. About 160,000 who fled the 12-mile evacuation zone, including 21,000 from Namie, are still living in temporary housing. Those from areas closest to the site may have to wait decades before their irradiated communities are safe to live in again. Many older residents accept they will die before their homes are inhabitable; their younger relatives are trying to build new lives elsewhere. Google's Street View imagery takes users on a 360-degree virtual tour of Namie's eerily quiet streets, its earthquake-damaged buildings and the overturned cars and fishing boats resting where they were deposited by the tsunami. Koto Naganuma, 32, whose home was destroyed by the waves, believes some Namie residents will be upset by images of familiar places that have been out of bounds for two years, but he is excited about plans to open up parts of the town for temporary visits from next month. "I'm looking forward to it," said Naganuma, who has visited Namie just once – and only for a few minutes – since the disaster. "I'm excited about being able to take a look at those places that are so dear to me. It will be hard, too. No one is going to be there." Baba said viewing Google's images brought back fond memories of festivals and other communal events in a tightly knit town, whose residents are scattered across Fukushima prefecture and other parts of Japan. "Those of us who belong to the older generation feel that we received this town from our ancestors, and we feel great pain that we cannot pass it down to our children," he said in a blogpost. "Ever since the disaster, the rest of the world has been moving forward and many places in Japan have started recovering. But, in Namie, time stands still. "We want this Street View imagery to become a permanent record of what happened to Namie in the earthquake, tsunami and nuclear disaster." Panoramic imagery of the town will be available on Google Maps, Google Earth and the Memories for the Future site, which has already carried before-and-after images of coastal communities swept away by the tsunami. "By capturing and publishing this imagery, we hope to allow people in Namie, in Japan and all around the world to see what the town currently looks like," the company said. "We also hope that this will keep alive memories of the disaster for future generations." The second anniversary of the disaster this month highlighted the plight of more than 300,000 people in north-east Japan who have yet to be permanently rehoused. The prime minister, Shinzo Abe, has promised to speed up the construction of homes for displaced tsunami survivors and nuclear evacuees. Abe, who visited Namie last weekend, is to announce plans this summer for the return of residents to some areas of the evacuation zone. Abe is expected to offer a timeframe for the completion of infrastructure repairs and the resumption of health and other services in selected neighbourhoods. But the operation to decontaminate residential areas is well behind schedule and the government has not found a storage site for huge quantities of irradiated soil and rubble. http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2013/mar/27/fukushima-google-street-view-meltdown-tsunami
  7. Have to say; loving this cover version. :twisted::twisted:
  8. Have to say; loving this cover version. :twisted::twisted:
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