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Well I have eaten Grarok, (tasty), which I understand is some type of squirrel, but I don't think I could eat Rat. It must be an inbuilt aversion. Although dormouse used to be a delicacy here in the UK in bygone days.

Thailand Ranked 3rd in Asia When It Comes to Eating Rat Meat

BANGKOK: -- Who would have thought? We've been hearing about the dog trade for weeks now. News of stray dogs being smuggled to neighboring countries. Today, we're met with even more shocking news. It turns out that Thailand is among several Asian countries which have a taste for rat meat. We're sure many of our readers are cringing at this very moment, but it certainly makes for interesting news.

Official numbers reveal that Thailand imports three tons of rat meat from Cambodia a day...yes, a day! This number does not include the amount of rats that are caught and eaten in vast farmlands across the north, northeast, and central parts of the country. The kingdom is ranked third behind Cambodia and Laos when it comes to consuming the meat of the small whiskered creatures.

For those of you wondering how Thais can stomach the dirty little animals, we must make it clear that when we say rat meat, we're not talking about sewer rats found in city areas. We're talking mostly of farm rats in the countryside which are believed to be much cleaner and toxic free.

Apparently, the practice has been a part of Indochina civilization for centuries. It is believed, although not proven, that the agricultural based countries of the region are more inclined to such delicacies. Farmers catch rodents to prevent them from damaging the crops. Said rodents end up on the supper table that evening. It has been reported that such tastes can be found in Thailand, Burma, Laos, Vietnam, and Cambodia.

The cultures of other ASEAN countries such as Singapore, Indonesia and the Philippines were highly influenced by the West and theoretically don't have such preferences.

Rat meat eating locals in Thailand are found mostly in the northeastern provinces. However, people in the north and central parts of the country are also found to have a taste for it. Provinces such as Udon Thani and Supanburi are widely known for the trade.

So how do Thais prefer their rat meat? Mostly, we like them grilled, crispy on the outside, moist on the inside. However, it is also widely found that rat meat is used in spicy Thai soups as well.

And make no mistake! The rat meat does not come cheap. Prices range from 180 to 250 baht per kilogram. So far, there is no known brand name for rat meat traders, but who knows, we could have a whole new business just waiting to be discovered.

Translated from www.manager.co.th

http://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/528491-thailand-ranks-3rd-in-asia-when-it-comes-to-eating-rat-meat/

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Although dormouse used to be a delicacy here in the UK in bygone days.

It was more a Roman delicacy, so would have been available wherever they had conquered.

Had dormouse stew when I was in Slovenia a few years back - think you can still get it there. Very bloody tasty! (mind you they eat bear too and make that mad Salamander brandy!)

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Well, I think as long as you don't catch the gully rat with all its diseases, why not? I have eaten roasted mini-frogs (the whole frog, because it is too small to be separated from things we normally don't eat), grilled tree bugs and ant eggs so far. I am still alive and I have to say that, except for the ant eggs that rather would fit as a kind of seasoning, I was quite satisfied with the taste.

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I heard about Rat Meat last time I was in BKK, but did not find any. This time I hope to taste it. Always good to try new things.

In BKK you don't look for rat meat. Rat meat comes looking for you. Just hang out on Sukhumvit around 3 or 4am. They'll dart in and out of piles of trash all night. You might have to bring a saddle to ride it home before you cook it though.

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